On Being a Lawyer in Porn…

 

I have to say that I am a very lucky individual. After fifteen years of practice I still wake up everyday looking forward to what I do. Most lawyers hate what they do by the time they are in their fifth or sixth year of practice as I actually did. Prior to getting into porn, I was an insurance defense attorney with seven years of experience in employment law and workers compensation. Insurance defense was not very interesting but it paid the bills.

Even though after just five years in I was able to start my own firm I still did not enjoy my practice. It was not challenging or interesting. I did have the good fortune of representing some of the largest employers in California including LAPD, LAFD, Los Angeles Unified School District, Boeing, Lockheed and Teledyne to name a few. But I also had the opportunity to represent companies such as Warner Brothers, Universal Pictures, Entertainment Partners and Cast & Crew, which gave me my first taste of the entertainment business.

Representing these entertainment giants is what led me down the not so primrose path to porn. I was approached by the Free Speech Coalition to give a presentation to their membership about on set injuries and how the interplay with employment and workers compensation law. Most of the then current adult industry attorneys were basically First Amendment specialists and did not have the background in employment law that I did. I happily agreed and have never looked back.

Needless to say after the seminar I was intrigued by the industry though I was never a big fan of porn. I think my earliest remembrances of porn was being in college and watching John Stagliano’s series about big boobs. But other than that I couldn’t name a single pornstar. It wasn’t until I came to California for law school that I had any real exposure to porn. While just a 1L in law school I was able to spend time with the man that founded the industry in Los Angeles, Milton Luros. That, however, is a story for another post but Google his name and see how important he is to this industry.

Even though I wasn’t a fan I did love what the industry stood for. I was always a supporter of free expression and love working in that environment. I actually worked as a DJ in a strip in New Jersey before law school and had also taught many of the bartenders that worked in various strip clubs. So I spent a fair amount of time hanging out with strippers and bartenders. I even lived with a stripper for three years before heading off to law school. Obviously, I had no problems with the free expression of sexuality as a way to earn a living.

So being a porn lawyer is almost a natural fit for me. I believe in the little guy and while we may be thought of as being a billion dollar a year industry I can assure you it’s mostly made up of little guys just trying to make a living. The days of millionaire pornographers are over. Now porn is basically made by a group of people with a passion for it. If things continue as they are we will be delisted as an industry and become a mere hobby – if piracy is let unchecked.

For those of you that are law students or lawyers thinking this is a great business to be in, you might want to think long and hard about that decision. While porn is definitely more mainstream then it use to be, there is still a stigma attached to it that will follow you, one that will definitely effect how the world sees you and what clients will hire you.

Either way, sometimes happiest is just more important than anything else.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s